CCR Details

INTRODUCTION, PRECAUTIONS, SOURCES

The beginning of the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) includes the introduction, precautions, and sources. Heading the CCR is the date and information on where the non-English version can be found. Next, a water provider may include an introductory statement about the past year’s water quality level. CCRs must indicate that some people are more at risk of getting ill from specific contaminants that can be found in water with a precaution for who should seek advice about drinking water from their healthcare provider. The source of water (either ground or surface water) is included next, along with the location and owner information. If the owner of the source water is taking any steps to reduce contamination risk, that may be included as well.

For the most part, the CCR reflects the quality of water when it is leaving the treatment plant. The exception to this rule is the information regarding compliance with standards for lead and copper. Those numbers are derived by testing the water at the tap in a sample of homes within the community. For that reason, the number reported will reflect an average level that people in that community can expect to experience in their homes. However, these numbers can vary based on a home’s location within the system, water use habits and plumbing system.

Water Assessment, Contaminants Monitoring, and Involvement

The CCR will also tell you how to access the results from any laboratory tests conducted on your water source. It may also show the results of the assessment such as the quantity and names of contaminants found in the source. The source of these contaminants (whether chemical or microbial) can be from natural sources, such as weathered rock containing arsenic, or introduced by animals, people, industrial sites dumping contaminants directly into the water, or related areas where contaminants can travel through the soil and into water sources.

If the concentration of a contaminant in drinking water is higher than the concentration the EPA considers to be safe, the report must also explain how the contaminant may affect human health and how it is being addressed or fixed.

Lead, Nitrate, and Water Quality Data Table

An educational statement about lead is required to be included in every CCR, even if lead was not found in the water source. Similar statements may be included for nitrate and arsenic depending on the concentration of each contaminant detected.

Inorganic Chemicals - Annual Monitoring at Plant Finished Water Tap

Contaminant Test Date Units Health GOAL
MCLG
Allowed Level
MCL
Level Detected Range of Detection Violation
Yes/No
Major Sources in Drinking Water
Fluoride 8/2010 ppm 4 4 1.40 0.56-1.40 no Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive, which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.
Nitrate 8/23/2010 ppm 10 10 0.32 n/a no Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.
Barium 6/9/2008 ppm 2 2 0.01 n/a no Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

Disinfectant Residuals and Disinfection By-Products - Monitoring in Distribution System

Contaminant Test Date Units Health GOAL
MCLG
Allowed Level
MCL
Level Detected Range of Detection Violation
Yes/No
Major Sources in Drinking Water
Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) 2/2009 - 11/2010 ppb n/a 80 18.5 9.2-40.1 no By-product of drinking water chlorination.
Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) 2/2009 - 11/2010 ppb n/a 60 10.1 6.0-17.1 no By-product of drinking water disinfection.
Disinfectant (Total Chlorine residual) 1/2010 - 12/2010 ppb MRDGL
4
MRDL
4
0.78 0.70-0.88 no Water additive used to control microbes.

The figure above is a sample version of the Water Quality Data Table included in your CCR. This sample is from the 2010 Huron Lake Water Treatment Plant CCR.

Description of Terms Found on Your CCR

The “Contaminants” section of your CCR includes anything found in your drinking water other than hydrogen and oxygen, the two elements that makeup water. Contaminants can impact you positively or negatively depending on the substance and the quantity.

In the sample table, there is residual Chloramine, TTHM, and HAA5 detected as well as Fluoride, Nitrate, and Barium.

The Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) and the Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal (MRDLG) indicates the level of contaminant and disinfection, respectively, at which your water is safe to drink. If a given contaminant concentration is below its MCLG or MRDLG, the report indicates there is no expected risk to your health.

In the sample report above, the MCLG/MRDLG for Fluoride is 4. Because the water does not exceed a level of 1.4, there is no health risk for these contaminants within this area.

The Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) are the highest concentrations contaminants and disinfectant residual, allowed in your water. The Treatment Technique (TT) is a required process intended to reduce the level of contamination in your water.

The ‘Your Water’ section shows the level at which the contaminants were found in your water. The Range on your CCR refers to the levels — both Low and High — at which contaminants were detected. A range of may exist due to changes in contaminant levels during a calendar year.

In the sample data table, we see the range of TTHM is highest from 9.2-40.1, but it does not exceed EPA standards of acceptable drinking water (80).

The ‘Sample Date’ is the date on which the sample was taken from your water source. The ‘Violation’ section indicates whether or not the contaminant has exceeded EPA maximum level, and ‘Typical Sources’ explains how the contaminant may have gotten into the water source, such as through runoff or erosion.

Action Levels, Violations and Exceedances

The Action Level (AL) is the concentration of a contaminant at which the water requires additional treatment. The ‘Number of Samples Exceeding the AL’ indicates how many individual samples that exceeded the Action Level.

2008 Lead and Copper Monitoring at Customers' Tap

Contaminant Test Date Units Health GOAL
MCLG
Action Level
AL
90th Percentile Value* Numbers of Samples over AL Violation
Yes/No
Major Sources in Drinking Water
Lead 2008 ppb 0 15       Corrosion of household plumbing system; Erosion of natural deposits
Copper 2008 ppm 1.3 1.3       Corrosion of household plumbing system; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives.

*The 90th Percentile value means 90 percent of the homes tested have lead and copper levels below the given 90th percentile value. If the 90th percentile value is above the AL, additional requirements must be met.

In the sample table, the AL for Lead is 15, and no samples exceed the action level, meaning that no immediate action against lead poisoning is necessary for this area.

The EPA requires that any violations of allowable contaminant levels be explained within the CCR. This includes the length of time the violation occurred, any potential adverse health effects associated with the violation, and how the offense is being addressed to reduce any negative outcomes.